My Posse Don’t Do Homework

My Posse Don’t Do Homework

My Posse Don’t Do Homework Overview

Another hilarious, alarming look at a school in a city from an unconventional teacher. Johnson, a former Navy and Marine Corps servicewoman (Making Waves 1986), took over the classroom at Parkmont High after a teacher broke down. She found herself in a crowded room with unruly students who were partial to Atom Bomb colognes and thunderbolt hairstyles. They tried all the usual techniques, but Johnson nearly gave up. They tried the usual tricks, but Johnson persevered, using a unique mix of boot-camp techniques and genuine warmth. One by one, students responded. Like Danny, an advanced thinker trapped in the body of a remedial student”, who was inspired by Johnson’s parakeet and turned from marginally to remarkable. Curtis, who had a blank journal for the entire year until The Merchant of Venice captured his imagination, or Curtis, who had nothing to say (I never had any to speak HTML0­_ HTML1_ HTML3_ Johnson learns some lessons along the way. From simple management skills (‘outshouting children is like trying to tell a pig how to sing”) to the most difficult realities of life (‘You can’t rescue a kid who doesn’t want to be saved ”).). This downstairs has been a common one, particularly in the 1960s, when several books by Kozol, Kohl, and Herndon first highlighted the inequities within school systems and the sad shuffle that awaited those who were least able. Johnson demonstrates the importance of basic respect and constant encouragement for disenfranchised students.

My Posse Don’t Do Homework Analysis

LouAnne Johnson’s title, “My Posse Don’t Do Homework”, clearly indicates how frustrated and liberal she was as a teacher. Her teaching career began with hateful students in her classroom. These children, however aggressive they were, had serious learning, behavior, and language problems. She felt deep compassion for them. These children were mostly not fluent in English. LouAnne recognized that these children needed to understand that they were not failures in their lives and that it was crucial for them to regain their self-esteem. This book reveals how teachers can influence their students’ lives. It also shows that teaching is not a one-size fits all approach. Teachers need to see what makes the classroom a learning environment and help students understand the importance of education. These strategies can be used as guidelines by teachers who place knowledge over grades.

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My Posse Don’t Do Homework, a book that describes the neglected and overlooked children in schools across the country is excellent. My Posse Don’t Do Homework teaches us how important it can be to nurture and care for students and show them that they, too, are important and can make a difference. The students were ready to learn from Ms. Johnson when she visited the class on the first day of school. According to My Posse Don’t Do Homework (19), one student told Ms. Johnson that Miss Shepard was her former teacher. Miss Shepard had dropped her book and ran out of the classroom crying the Friday before. They weren’t surprised she didn’t return. Their accomplishments were proud (19). A dictionary was then thrown at her head, and she left the classroom. She spoke to Hal Gray, a fellow student, after the dictionary incident. After having a short conversation with him, she returned to her class, where Petty Officer Hawks’ presence inspired her, and confronted her former drill instructor, who had thrown the dictionary at her. He was furious at her request to sit down after she got in their faces. After explaining her Marine and Navy backgrounds, she won their respect and some of their trust. This book does not suggest that every teacher should be a certified teacher.

Teacher’s Day Books

About the Author

LouAnne Johnson, an ex-Marine, decided to become an English teacher. The autobiography “My Posse Don’t Do Homework” chronicles the author’s negative experiences as a California public high school teacher. LouAnne is a member of a group called “Hooligans”, which are children who excel in antisocial activities and have consistently failed. She knows immediately that this is the right job for her, and she is determined to teach the children.

Understand Your Students

LouAnne considered teaching students who are marginalized or unhappy a mission. The author’s tragic experiences immediately grab the reader’s attention. Even worse, the students were from diverse backgrounds and races. The story includes the terrifying tale of an ex-teacher of English who was taken to hospital by the students. LouAnne did not panic, however. LouAnne did not view the children as hateful but felt compassion for them. She was solely motivated to save these children from hooliganism. She did everything she could to bring them closer to her. She was a meticulous observer of each student and dealt with them appropriately. There are many fascinating stories about the challenges and successes of inspiring teachers. This book is light and humorous, making it easy to read.

The Light To Glory

LouAnne’s students are also featured in the book. This book offers a unique insight into their lives and upbringing. Their families were mostly immigrants, which explains the language barriers and the failure to adapt to American society. These children saw school as an emotional storehouse and not a learning center. LouAnne preserved this emotional storage and brought to mind the desire to study, which was never part of the school environment. Her students realize that they don’t need to be hopeless or rejected and can build a better future for themselves. LouAnne was their key to finding the other side and brighter side of life. After intensive Shakespeare study sessions, the same children who had laughed at Shakespeare at the beginning couldn’t resist reading all of his plays. LouAnne was able to touch the delicate side of these children’s lives, which allowed her to establish a connection and helped to maintain that connection. Did she think she was a magician? No. No. She was faced with failures, disappointments, and regrets. She had to face them all, but she persevered.

My Posse Don’t Do Homework is inspirational by its very nature. It also has a calmness that keeps the reader going. The language is key, and it has a little humor that keeps the story moving. Even the most reluctant reader will be motivated to finish the book. It is very realistic and emotionally charged. You will both laugh and cry. In 1995, the book was made into a film called “Dangerous Minds”, which received incredible responses.

The Book’s Insights,

American schools have replaced education with ideological indoctrination at all levels, from kindergarten through postgraduate programs. This is according to conservative think-tanker Sowell. This aggressive attack on the current educational establishment. Sowell’s disagreement with “values clarification programs” (such as sex education and death-sensitizing) isn’t that Sowell disagrees with them but that they divert resources and time from intellectual analysis training that allows students to think for themselves. Sowell claims that value clarification programs, which Carl Rogers, the psychotherapist, inspired, inculcate values confusion. He argues that public schools have abdicated their responsibility for educating students to develop maturity and experience. Sowell takes a more friendly approach to higher education. He attributes the decline in the quality of classroom instruction and the insatiable appetite for tangentially related research funds and bloated athletic programs to which an entire chapter is dedicated, which is irrelevant to the larger argument. These assertions are unlikely to change minds because they are so inveterately based on anecdotal evidence (for example, Brooke Shields’s graduation from Princeton without having taken any courses in math, history, chemistry, or government). The details of Sowell’s indictment, which states that Johnny can’t think and “Johnny doesn’t know what thinking,”–are entertaining, not persuasive, or new.

My Posse Don’t Do Homework Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

My Posse Don’t Do Homework was a benefit, but she found her caring personality to be more effective in dealing avec the rebellious students. She taught English at Parkmont High, an inner-city school located in California. Johnson struggled to reach and educate group teenagers from immigrant families. They often enjoy achievement and are willing to accept their failures. Anecdotes of success and failures are shared with color by an inspiring teacher who used “a little blatant corruption” to devise unorthodox approaches to help minority students learn better and improve their self-image. One such scheme involved kissing a child who slept in class. Johnson’s gritty account of her struggle to keep her students out of bureaucratic cracks is tempered by humor. Johnson’s book is filled with unreserved affection for her students, who “keeps me coming back every single year to my lopsided wood desk, my crumbling bulletin board, my outdated textbooks, and my handful of dreams.”

Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

My Posse Don’t Do Homework is reminiscent of Bel Kaufman’s Up the Down Staircase (Prentice-Hall 1988). It explores the misadventures and adventures of the author, a high school teacher in an inner-city California school. This book provides insight into the lives and emotional baggage of students. Johnson discusses her experiences and failures trying to make connections with her students. This fast-paced, easy-to-read book will appeal to you.

Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

My Posse Don’t Do Homework shares a funny account of teaching in an American high school. Johnson’s “posse”, which consists of unprivileged teens from Parkmont High School, California, is Johnson’s. Johnson, the new teacher, has the energy and optimism to motivate her students. Johnson’s methods may be unconventional, but the issues they address are very real. Johnson claims that Johnson succeeds where others fail, writing with humor and empathy about her students. However, fellow teachers are often stereotyped as being overworked or uninspiring. This book will be distributed in libraries serving in-service veterans and student teachers.

Nancy E. Zuwiyya (Binghamton City Sch.) Dist.,

Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

Another hilarious, alarming look at a school in a city from an unconventional teacher. Johnson, a former Navy and Marine Corps servicewoman (Making Waves 1986), took over the classroom at Parkmont High after a teacher broke down. She found herself in a crowded room with unruly students who were partial to Atom Bomb colognes and thunderbolt hairstyles. They tried all the usual techniques, but Johnson nearly gave up. They tried the usual tricks, but Johnson persevered, using a unique mix of boot-camp techniques and genuine warmth. One by one, students responded. Like Danny, an advanced thinker trapped in the body of a remedial student”, who was inspired by Johnson’s parakeet and turned from marginally to remarkable. Curtis, who had a blank journal for the entire year until The Merchant of Venice captured his imagination, or Curtis, who had nothing to say (I never had any to speak HTML0­_ HTML1_ HTML3_ Johnson learns some lessons along the way. From simple management skills (outshouting children is like trying to tell a pig how to sing”) to the most difficult facts of life (You cannot save a child who doesn’t want ”).). This down staircase has been a common one before, particularly in the 1960s, when a number of books by Kozol, Kohl, and Herndon first highlighted the inequalities in school systems, as well as the sad shuffle that awaits those who are least able. My Posse Don’t Do Homework demonstrates the importance of basic respect and constant encouragement for disenfranchised students. Copyright (c.1992, Kirkus Associates LP. All rights reserved.

Other Books Related to My Posse Don’t Do Homework

Dangerous Mind

She bullied, bluffed, and bribed her students to care about school. The pretty, petite ex-marine explained to them that she was trained to kill with her bare hands if this didn’t work. They were the class from Hell-thirty-four inner-city sophomores, which she inherited from an educator who had been “pushed over to the edge.” She was told that “those children have tasted blood.” They’re dangerous.” LouAnne Johnson, however, had a different vision. LouAnne Johnson saw intelligent young people with dreams and intelligence, whereas the school system only saw 34 unreachable children. She broke the rules to help them believe in themselves and give hope when others had given up on them. She fought against the odds when statistics showed that they would never graduate. This is their amazing story. If you enjoyed Stand and Deliver, you will be cheering LouAnne Johnson and Dangerous Minds.

Buy My Posse Don’t Do Homework.

LouAnne Johnson. St. Martin’s Press. ISBN 978-0-312-07638-2

Johnson’s Marine Corps training was a benefit, but she found her caring personality to be more effective in dealing avec the rebellious students. She taught English at Parkmont High, an inner-city school located in California. Johnson struggled to reach and educate a group of teenagers from immigrant families. They often enjoy achievement and are willing to accept their failures. Anecdotes of success and failures are shared with color by an inspiring teacher who used a lot of bribery and devised unconventional approaches (including kissing a child who slept in class) to adapt to minority students’ learning styles. Johnson’s gritty account of her struggle to keep her students out of bureaucratic cracks is tempered by humor. Johnson’s book is filled with unreserved affection for her students, who “keep me coming back year after year to my lopsided wooden table, my crumbling bulletin board, my outdated textbooks, and my handful of dreams.” (Aug.)

 

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