Reaction paper

By 1938, Germany had rebuilt its military under Adolf Hitler, in violation of the Treaty of Versailles. Hitler was looking to expand Germany’s borders, claiming that he was attempting to unite ethnic Germans in Europe. Recent memories of the First World War left European countries reluctant to prepare for war. Between 1936 and 1938, Germany remilitarized the Rhineland, annexed Austria, and in September 1938, Hitler demanded that Czechoslovakia give Germany the Sudetenland, a region with a heavy ethnic-German population. The British government took the role of negotiating with Germany. British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain met with Hitler in Munich to find a compromise over the Sudetenland. The Munich Agreement (September 29, 1938) stated that Germany would receive the Sudetenland, and promised Germany not to take further land from Czechoslovakia. The Munich Agreement became synonymous with the policy of appeasement. On March 13-14, 1939, Germany violated the Munich Agreement by occupying Czechoslovakia. On September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland, which initiated World War II in Europe. On September 3, 1939, Great Britain and France declared war on Germany. For more context, watch the Video Segment “Germany on the Road to War and Policy of Appeasement” in Lesson 13. Assignment Read the following excerpts from primary sources on the British Appeasement of Hitler. The first page has a timeline and the sources are located on the next pages. Appeasement Sources.pdf Using specific examples from the sources, write one single-spaced 12-font page addressing the following question: Was appeasement the right policy for Britain in 1938? You need to make a central claim (a thesis statement) and then support it using specific examples from the primary sources. You need to use at least one example from each source. Format of the assignment: On the top of the page, type: “Week 13-Reaction Paper.” Then type the question and your answer. Your paper should be 12-font, single-spaced. You need to write a minimum of one page. There is no limit on maximum pages. Use quotation marks when citing directly from the sources. You can use either MLA or Chicago style of citation. Type your paper in your text-editing program, save it on your computer, and upload your file. I will accept the following file formats: .doc, docx, .pdf Note about Citation Styles: For citations, use MLA style or Chicago style. Historians use the Chicago style (highly recommended for history majors), but I will also accept the MLA style. Chicago Style: The Chicago style has two systems of citation: the Notes-Bibliography System and the Author-Date system. You can use either one of them. You can learn more about these two systems at this website: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/chicago_manual_17th_edition/cmos_formatting_and_style_guide/chicago_manual_of_style_17th_edition.html MLA Style: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_in_text_citations_the_basics.html If you choose to use the MLA style, you can just write the last name of the author and page number in parenthesis next to a quotation. If there is no author, use the first word of the title instead and a page number if available. You don’t need to include Work Cited page if you are not using any external sources. If you consult external sources, you do need to include Work Cited page at the end of your paper. Citations Document A “Neville Chamberlain to the House of Commons, October 5, 1938,” Parliamentary Debates, 5th series, vol.339 (1938). Retrieved from https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/munich.htm Document B “Winston Churchill to the House of Commons, October 5, 1938,” Parliamentary Debates, 5th series, vo.339 (1938). Retrieved from https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/munich.htm Document C Vernon Bartlett, And Now, Tomorrow(1960). Excerpt retrieved from http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/2WWappeasement.htm. Document D Henry (Chips) Channon, diary entry (March 15, 1939). Retrieved from http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/2WWappeasement.htm Document E The Earl of Halifax, The Fulness of Days, 1957. Retrieved from http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/2WWhalifaxL.htmBy 1938, Germany had rebuilt its military under Adolf Hitler, in violation of the Treaty of Versailles. Hitler was looking to expand Germany’s borders, claiming that he was attempting to unite ethnic Germans in Europe. Recent memories of the First World War left European countries reluctant to prepare for war. Between 1936 and 1938, Germany remilitarized the Rhineland, annexed Austria, and in September 1938, Hitler demanded that Czechoslovakia give Germany the Sudetenland, a region with a heavy ethnic-German population. The British government took the role of negotiating with Germany. British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain met with Hitler in Munich to find a compromise over the Sudetenland. The Munich Agreement (September 29, 1938) stated that Germany would receive the Sudetenland, and promised Germany not to take further land from Czechoslovakia. The Munich Agreement became synonymous with the policy of appeasement. On March 13-14, 1939, Germany violated the Munich Agreement by occupying Czechoslovakia. On September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland, which initiated World War II in Europe. On September 3, 1939, Great Britain and France declared war on Germany. For more context, watch the Video Segment “Germany on the Road to War and Policy of Appeasement” in Lesson 13. Assignment Read the following excerpts from primary sources on the British Appeasement of Hitler. The first page has a timeline and the sources are located on the next pages. Appeasement Sources.pdf Note: if you are having difficulty opening the pdf file, use this link to access the sources (I copied the sources here for easier access): https://docs.google.com/document/d/11DooGwmmm4ww3MEAxB3zt-reEHX5cmSwG9u92B1HADk/edit?usp=sharing Using specific examples from the sources, write one single-spaced 12-font page addressing the following question: Was appeasement the right policy for Britain in 1938? You need to make a central claim (a thesis statement) and then support it using specific examples from the primary sources. You need to use at least one example from each source. Format of the assignment: On the top of the page, type: “Week 13-Reaction Paper.” Then type the question and your answer. Your paper should be 12-font, single-spaced. You need to write a minimum of one page. There is no limit on maximum pages. Use quotation marks when citing directly from the sources. You can use either MLA or Chicago style of citation. Type your paper in your text-editing program, save it on your computer, and upload your file. I will accept the following file formats: .doc, docx, .pdf Note about Citation Styles: For citations, use MLA style or Chicago style. Historians use the Chicago style (highly recommended for history majors), but I will also accept the MLA style. Chicago Style: The Chicago style has two systems of citation: the Notes-Bibliography System and the Author-Date system. You can use either one of them. You can learn more about these two systems at this website: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/chicago_manual_17th_edition/cmos_formatting_and_style_guide/chicago_manual_of_style_17th_edition.html MLA Style: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_in_text_citations_the_basics.html If you choose to use the MLA style, you can just write the last name of the author and page number in parenthesis next to a quotation. If there is no author, use the first word of the title instead and a page number if available. You don’t need to include Work Cited page if you are not using any external sources. If you consult external sources, you do need to include Work Cited page at the end of your paper. Citations (documents are on source 2) Document A “Neville Chamberlain to the House of Commons, October 5, 1938,” Parliamentary Debates, 5th series, vol.339 (1938). Retrieved from https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/munich.htm Document B “Winston Churchill to the House of Commons, October 5, 1938,” Parliamentary Debates, 5th series, vo.339 (1938). Retrieved from https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/munich.htm Document C Vernon Bartlett, And Now, Tomorrow(1960). Excerpt retrieved from http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/2WWappeasement.htm. Document D Henry (Chips) Channon, diary entry (March 15, 1939). Retrieved from http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/2WWappeasement.htm Document E The Earl of Halifax, The Fulness of Days, 1957. Retrieved from http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/2WWhalifaxL.htm

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